Office Space Vacancies Monitored Closely As Numbers Begin To Fall

By CHUCK GREEN Office vacancy rates are being monitored closely as the commercial space industry continues to grapple with COVID’s effects on the workplace. In Los Angeles, office activity stagnated in the first quarter of 2022. One-fifth of total inventory remained vacant and rents remained unchanged, according to Greg Cornfield at Commercial Observer. Other major metro areas, including New York City, Boston, San Francisco, Washington DC, and Chicago, also continue to experience double-digit vacancy rates. Stemming from remote work due to the variant, San Francisco and DC reportedly kicked off the year with vacancies approaching 20%. In major U.S. markets vacancies of around 60% were recently shown by Kastle Systems, which measures occupancy by looking at foot traffic into offices.…

Is Home Ownership More Affordable Than Renting? It Depends.

By KIMBERLEY HAAS A report released this month suggests that despite rising home prices it is more affordable to own a median-priced house than to rent a three-bedroom property in a majority of the United States. ATTOM’s 2022 Rental Affordability Report used fair-market rent data from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, wage data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and sales deed data in 1,154 counties to find that home ownership will be more affordable in a majority of the country again in 2022. Todd Teta, Chief Product Officer at ATTOM, said home ownership still remains the more affordable option for average workers because it takes up a smaller portion of their pay when the math is…

Is Migration Away From Urban Areas A Trend Or Here To Stay?

By SCOTT KIMBLER With Americans working from home since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, some densely populated areas of the United States are losing residents as people move to the suburbs to escape city life, and those watching this trend say landlords shouldn’t hold their breath hoping a younger generation of renters will replace them. Elizabeth Rose of Mortgage 300 in Dallas, Texas, says there are a variety of reasons why people are moving out of big cities and isn’t sure if this migration to the suburbs and rural areas will continue after the pandemic ends. “We are seeing a trend in my area of people moving outward and there are a few factors driving this,” Rose said in…