Inventory Rebound May Be On The Horizon

Active listings were down only 12.2% in April, its smallest YOY decline since December 2019, according to Realtor.com’s Monthly Housing Trends Report. This suggests that inventory may be about to bounce back up after the crippling shortage of the last year. Though new listings declined, the number of homes under contract saw a YOY decrease as well, closing some of the distance between supply and demand. Pending listings were down 9.5% YOY. Improvements were seen in the share of mid-sized homes, adding to listings for families upgrading from starter homes and possibly easing the way for first-time homebuyers who have struggled to find affordable entry homes during the pandemic. “April data suggests a positive turn of events is on the…

Inventory, First-Time Buyers Won’t Bounce Back Until 2024

Inventory and first-time buyers won’t bounce back until 2024, according to Zillow’s Home Price Expectations Survey. The survey polled a panel of housing experts who said they anticipate for-sale inventory levels will take two years to climb back to pre-pandemic levels. Total inventory fell from a monthly average of just 1 million in 2021 and early 2022 figures aren’t looking any better, both down from 1.6 million units in 2018 and 2019. The largest group of Zillow’s respondents (38%) expect inventory to reach 1.5 million units or more in 2024, though the second largest group (36%) predicted 2023. “Inventory and mortgage rates will determine how far and how fast home prices will rise this year and beyond,” said Zillow senior…

Broker Confidence Dropped In February

Broker confidence fell for the second straight month in February, though brokers are “cautiously optimistic” about the future, according to RISMedia’s February Broker Confidence Index (BCI). The index, which is scaled 1 to 10, fell to 7.5 from January’s 7.9 and December 2021’s 8.2. For the 3,000 brokers surveyed, rising interest rates were not a big cause for concern. They felt that rising rates won’t hurt demand considering current market conditions. Brokers’ biggest worries were inflation and inventory, with a nod to the ongoing crisis in Ukraine. “The continued lack of supply has really created a bubble,” Quincy Smith, a broker with ERA Matt Fischer in Yuma, Arizona, told RISMedia.  “With the equity market starting what appears to be a…

Stock Shortages And Rising Prices Expected To Continue In The Early Months Of 2022

Home price appreciation and stock shortages are likely to continue through the first few months of 2022, as December saw price growth pick back up heading into the new year, a Realtor.com report shows. Though seller sentiment is positive, new listings are shrinking, squeezing the already competitive market. The number of homes actively for sale in January dropped 28.4% year-over-year (YOY), or 163,000 homes. Newly listed homes fell by 9.1% YOY and were 16.8% lower from typical 2017-2020 levels. The January national median listing price for active listings was $375,000, a 10.3% increase YOY and up 25% from January 2020. The median listing price for a typical single-family home increased 18.6% YOY. The report notes that though high home prices…

December Inventory At All-Time Low

Monthly home value appreciation accelerated for the first time since July as potential buyers continue to outnumber new listings, driving December inventory to an all-time low, according to Zillow’s latest market report. “Home shoppers picked the shelves clean this December, leaving fewer active listings than ever before in the U.S. housing market,” said Jeff Tucker, senior economist at Zillow.  “Enough determined buyers kept up their house hunt to reignite monthly price appreciation. Rising mortgage rates could be the next potential headwind, but demand has proven persistent; neither high prices nor slim inventories have deterred buyers so far.” The typical home value is now $320,662, 19.6% above that of December 2020 and a record high for Zillow’s data, which dates back…

Reality Check: COVID Deaths Will Lead To Increase In Housing Inventory

By KIMBERLEY HAAS It may be a harsh reality to face, but the data is clear: There will be more houses on the market in 2022 because of the number of people who have died due to COVID-19 and its variants. This sobering fact was highlighted during the National Association of Real Estate Editors conference in Miami, Fla., last week. As of Monday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 793,937 COVID deaths of Americans. More of those deaths have occurred since the first vaccines became available than before. Approximately 77% of people over the age of five have had at least one vaccination, according to their website. Community transmission is high in many parts of the country…